Monday, August 25, 2008

GOOD Magazine's Education Issue

I just wanted to post an update on the Obama/McCain education debate. The latest issue of GOOD Magazine is the Education Issue and likewise features an illuminating (and slightly distressing) bunch of articles on the state of learning and teaching in the U.S. and abroad. Included is a breakdown similar to the one I posted from the NEA pamphlet.

Here it is:

OBAMA AND McCAIN
face off on the education issues:


NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND

Obama: Slammed NCLB as an “empty slogan” and an unfulfilled promise. He voiced his agreement, however, with the policy’s initial objectives, differing on the importance of standardized testing.

McCain: Believes in the policy’s emphasis on accountability, and holding American kids to competitive standards. He acknowledges its imperfections, but would push for the legislation to continue if he were president.

CHARTER SCHOOLS

Obama: Believes in continued federal funding for charter schools.

McCain: Supports the existence of charter schools, as well as private schools and public schools, and favors leaving the decision to parents.

TEACHER SALARIES

Obama: Wants to raise teachers’ salaries, pay off their student loans, and design programs to recruit more of them.

McCain: Advocates a system for pay increases, with teacher testing and merit pay.

VOUCHERS

Obama: Fears that school vouchers will further deteriorate public schools, leaving them underfunded and de facto segregated.

McCain: Wants to enable parents to privatize their kids’ education with federal funding—$5.5 billion over three years, presenting a million students with vouchers of up to $2,000 annually.

—EMMA VERRILL


Feature writer and education expert Gary Stager sums up the problems with NCLB quite succinctly in the cover story: 
"The theory behind the tests seems to be analogous to the theory that taking a sick patient’s temperature every seven minutes will cure him."

Be sure to pick up the issue. GOOD continues to present vital information in innovative and eye-opening ways.

[image courtesy of GOOD Magazine]

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